Category Archives: Law Students

“Children are Different”: Culpability and the Mandatory Sentencing of Juveniles after Miller v. Alabama & Jackson v. Hobbs

The title of this post is the title of the 2012 Symposium of The University of Minnesota’s Journal of Law & Inequality.  It will be held on Thursday, October 4, and it looks great. Find out more and register here. Here … Continue reading

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Posted in Conferences, Law Schools, Law Students, Legal Scholarship, Miller v. Alabama, Uncategorized | Comments Off on “Children are Different”: Culpability and the Mandatory Sentencing of Juveniles after Miller v. Alabama & Jackson v. Hobbs

For Children and Families, it’s a Poorly Mixed World

Here is my column appearing today at the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange: The academic year has started at the law school where I teach third-year students advocacy skills and legal doctrine in the area of juvenile courts and delinquency. At … Continue reading

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Posted in Clinical Legal Education, Juveniles, Law Schools, Law Students, Race, Class, Ethnicity | Comments Off on For Children and Families, it’s a Poorly Mixed World

Keeping the Promise of Gault: Requiring Post-Adjudicatory Juvenile Defenders

The title of this post is the title of a new article in the Georgetown Journal of Poverty Law and Policy by Professor Megan F. Chaney (La Verne College of Law) on the need for post-adjudicatory juvenile defenders (available via … Continue reading

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Posted in Advocacy, Conditions of Confinement, Criminal /Juvenile Defense, Juveniles, Law Students, Legal Scholarship, Post-Conviction, Rehabilitation, State Laws | 8 Comments