Category Archives: Law Schools

Juveniles and the Supreme Court: Conference at Loyola Law School 10/12/12

If folks are in the Los Angeles area on Friday, October 12, 2012, please try to attend a conference on “Juveniles and the Supreme Court” at Loyola Law School. Here is the schedule:   8:30 -9:00 am     Registration … Continue reading

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Posted in Analysis, Conferences, Law Schools, Legal Scholarship, Miller v. Alabama, U.S. Supreme Court | 1 Comment

Building Bridges Instead of Walls

My most recent column, published by Youth Today: Growing up, I lived a short bike ride away from my grandmother.  An elementary school reading teacher, she was always a source of stability for me. When I would go to her … Continue reading

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Posted in Clinical Legal Education, Juvenile Court, Juveniles, Law Schools, Law Students | 3 Comments

“Children are Different”: Culpability and the Mandatory Sentencing of Juveniles after Miller v. Alabama & Jackson v. Hobbs

The title of this post is the title of the 2012 Symposium of The University of Minnesota’s Journal of Law & Inequality.  It will be held on Thursday, October 4, and it looks great. Find out more and register here. Here … Continue reading

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Posted in Conferences, Law Schools, Law Students, Legal Scholarship, Miller v. Alabama, Uncategorized | Comments Off on “Children are Different”: Culpability and the Mandatory Sentencing of Juveniles after Miller v. Alabama & Jackson v. Hobbs

For Children and Families, it’s a Poorly Mixed World

Here is my column appearing today at the Juvenile Justice Information Exchange: The academic year has started at the law school where I teach third-year students advocacy skills and legal doctrine in the area of juvenile courts and delinquency. At … Continue reading

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Posted in Clinical Legal Education, Juveniles, Law Schools, Law Students, Race, Class, Ethnicity | Comments Off on For Children and Families, it’s a Poorly Mixed World

Law Faculty Blogs and Disruptive Innovation

The title of this post is the title of a notable new essay by Professor J. Robert Brown of the University of Denver, available on SSRN (the data may be found here).  Professor Brown provides an analysis of the role of the law faculty … Continue reading

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Posted in Blogosphere, Law Schools, Legal Scholarship | Comments Off on Law Faculty Blogs and Disruptive Innovation

Texas Tech Juvenile Law Symposium

Texas Tech Law School and their Law Review will be hosting the seventh annual Criminal Law Symposium on Friday, April 5, 2013, which will focus on juveniles. National experts on juvenile transfer, procedural rights, and punishment will exchange ideas and commentary on these issues, among others. … Continue reading

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Posted in Conferences, Juveniles, Law Schools | Comments Off on Texas Tech Juvenile Law Symposium

Clara Foltz, Barbara Babcock, and Me

It seems fitting that having written my earlier post about the psyche of the public defender, I would come upon a piece by Professor Barbara Babcock (Stanford) in the current issue of Criminal Justice Magazine based on Clara Foltz, who first developed the … Continue reading

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Posted in Books, Criminal /Juvenile Defense, Gender, Law Schools, Legal Scholarship, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Bridging the Gap Between Professors and Practitioners

This morning’s post got me thinking about the thoughtful legal scholarship written on the role of the public defender.  One of my objectives with this blog is to try to bridge the gap between practitioners and legal scholars, to remind … Continue reading

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Posted in Criminal /Juvenile Defense, Law Schools, Legal Scholarship | 2 Comments