Category Archives: Guest Blogger

Youth and Interrogation

By Kevin Lapp, Associate Professor of Law, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Advocates, courts, and policymakers across the nation are considering how far the Supreme Court’s “children are different in a way that matters” criminal justice jurisprudence should extend. One of … Continue reading

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Posted in Guest Blogger, Interrogation, Juveniles, Law Schools, U.S. Supreme Court, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Youth and Interrogation

No Perfect Victim

By Sarah Smith, JD, and Carlene Gonzalez, Ph.D., in conjunction with the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Most people would agree that the victim of a crime is the last person who deserves to be judged. Yet … Continue reading

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Posted in Guest Blogger, Social science | 2 Comments

Perceiving Adolescence

By Kevin Lapp, Associate Professor, Loyola Law School|Los Angeles The challenge of demarcating adolescence from childhood and adulthood comes mainly from figuring out when it ends. 18 has been the traditional end point, but many experts increasingly view adolescence as … Continue reading

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Posted in Guest Blogger, Race, Class, Ethnicity, Social science, U.S. Supreme Court | Comments Off on Perceiving Adolescence

25 Year-Old Adolescents?

By Kevin Lapp, Associate Professor of Law, Loyola Law School|Los Angeles Adolescents are neither children nor adults. But who falls within the category of adolescents? Given the great advantages of age-based distinctions in clarity and efficiency, when does adolescence start … Continue reading

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Just World Belief and Victim Blaming

By Alicia DeVault, B.S., and Martha-Elin Blomquist, Ph.D. Media coverage of recent events such as campus sexual assaults and officer-involved shootings brings to light a topic that is not often discussed: victim blaming. Victim blaming can be defined as holding … Continue reading

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Posted in Guest Blogger, Psychology, Social science, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Engagement of Victims in Juvenile and Family Courts

By Shawn C. Marsh, Ph.D. and Kelly Ranasinghe, J.D., C.W.L.S. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than three million children were reported to authorities for abuse or neglect in 2012, with approximately two million of … Continue reading

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Posted in Guest Blogger, Juvenile Court, Rehabilitation, Social science | Comments Off on Engagement of Victims in Juvenile and Family Courts

Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope

By Patricia Robinson, University of North Carolina School of Law ’16 Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope (2014) by Nicholas Frank is a book in which you know the story before you even begin. A … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Books, Guest Blogger, Sentencing | Comments Off on Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope

Not So Well-Regulated Militias in Schools

Written by Jason Langberg Would you want armed former cops and soldiers patrolling your office? Your supermarket? Your place of worship? I wouldn’t. So why are policymakers putting them in schools? Can’t we all agree that schools should be supportive, … Continue reading

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Posted in Education, Guest Blogger, School to Prison Pipeline, State Laws | 2 Comments

Telling the Whole Truth about Juvenile Incarceration Rates

While a new report finds that juvenile incarceration rates are declining in the United States, there is more to the story than just the numbers.  In this guest post, Jason Langberg, staff attorney with Legal Aid of North Carolina, examines … Continue reading

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Posted in Conditions of Confinement, Delinquency, Guest Blogger, Juveniles, North Carolina, Race, Class, Ethnicity, Reports, School to Prison Pipeline, State Laws | 3 Comments

School Policing Reform: Much Needed and Long Overdue

Law enforcement officers have become commonplace in public schools throughout the United States over the last two decades. However, law enforcement officers who are permanently assigned to schools – called school resource officers (SROs) – can have negative impacts on … Continue reading

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Posted in Education, Guest Blogger, North Carolina, School to Prison Pipeline, Uncategorized | Comments Off on School Policing Reform: Much Needed and Long Overdue