Category Archives: Adult Court

Right to Counsel in Nonpayment Hearings

In my last post, I discussed the phenomenon that I call “the new peonage,” in which criminal justice debt creates a two-tiered system of justice in our juvenile and criminal courtrooms.  One of my proposals for reform is to establish the … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Criminal /Juvenile Defense, Poverty, Race, Class, Ethnicity, Right to Counsel, U.S. Supreme Court, Uncategorized | Comments Off on Right to Counsel in Nonpayment Hearings

The New Peonage

On November 24, 2004, a thirteen-year-old boy named Taylor M. and several other boys in Ventura County, California, threw rocks at construction equipment owned by to J&S Excavating [J&S]. After another boy threw a firecracker into a bulldozer, Taylor shut its door, … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Analysis, Juvenile Court, Legal History, Legal Scholarship, Poverty, Race, Class, Ethnicity, U.S. Supreme Court | 1 Comment

Charged as an Adult because an Adult When Charged

By Kevin Lapp, Associate Professor of Law, Loyola Law School-Los Angeles A curious case from the Oklahoma Court of Criminal Appeals decided last month held that a juvenile was properly tried and sentenced as an adult for a crime committed … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Case Law, Guest Blogger, Juvenile Court, State Laws | 1 Comment

Juvenile Lifers: Reason for Hope

On December 1, 2014, the Supreme Court again deflected an effort to clarify whether its landmark 2012 decision in Miller v. Alabama banning mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles should be applied retroactively. It was the second time this … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Case Law, Miller v. Alabama, Sentencing, State Laws, U.S. Supreme Court | 1 Comment

Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope

By Patricia Robinson, University of North Carolina School of Law ’16 Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope (2014) by Nicholas Frank is a book in which you know the story before you even begin. A … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Books, Guest Blogger, Sentencing | Comments Off on Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope

Worse than Making Sausages

When I first moved to North Carolina nine years ago, I remember being shocked when I learned that juvenile court jurisdiction ended at age 16 for all purposes and with no exceptions.  This means that if your 16-year-old son or … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Juvenile Court, Legal Scholarship, North Carolina, State Laws | 3 Comments

Defending a Terror Suspect

Since the capture and arrest of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (pictured on the left at his high school graduation in Cambridge, Massachusetts), the college sophomore charged with the Boston Marathon bombing, I have thought about another young man who was charged with … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Criminal /Juvenile Defense, Legal Profession, Media, Prosecutor's Role, Right to Counsel, Sentencing, Terrorism cases | Comments Off on Defending a Terror Suspect

“Children are Different:” Constitutional Values and Justice Policy

The title of this post is the title of a notable new law review essay by Professor Elizabeth Scott of Columbia Law School, which is forthcoming in the Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law.  The article is posted and available via … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Analysis, Legal Scholarship, Miller v. Alabama, Sentencing, U.S. Supreme Court | 3 Comments

Sara Kruzan — Originally Sentenced to JLWOP — is Eligible for Parole

With the 2012 Supreme Court decision in Miller v. Alabama, striking down mandatory JLWOP for homicide, there has been increased optimism that the U.S. has turned a corner in the inhumane sentencing of youth. Although the decision did not affect … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Miller v. Alabama, Sentencing, U.S. Supreme Court, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Reconsidering Life Sentences for Juveniles who Kill

My latest for the Huffington Post: In the 1993 book Dead Man Walking, Sister Helen Prejean tells the story of people directly impacted by capital punishment — convicted murderers counting down to their own executions, wardens and guards dutifully operating the … Continue reading

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Posted in Adult Court, Death Penalty, Juveniles, Miller v. Alabama, Post-Conviction, Sentencing, U.S. Supreme Court | 3 Comments