Author Archives: Tamar Birckhead

About Tamar Birckhead

Law

Keeping a Grim Tally in Juvenile Court

One recent morning I sat in juvenile delinquency court on the fifth floor of the county courthouse in Durham, N.C., and kept a bleak tally. A 14-year-old boy admitted to a larceny charge for having stolen a video console and … Continue reading

Posted in Juvenile Court, Juveniles, North Carolina, Race, Class, Ethnicity, School to Prison Pipeline, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Juvenile Lifers: Reason for Hope

On December 1, 2014, the Supreme Court again deflected an effort to clarify whether its landmark 2012 decision in Miller v. Alabama banning mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles should be applied retroactively. It was the second time this … Continue reading

Posted in Adult Court, Case Law, Miller v. Alabama, Sentencing, State Laws, U.S. Supreme Court | 1 Comment

Kiddie Court is No Joke for Juveniles

A client of mine, who I’ll call Deanna, was a 15-year-old in the ninth grade at a public high school in North Carolina. She lived with her mother, who was unemployed, and two younger brothers in government-subsidized housing. She had … Continue reading

Posted in Juvenile Court, Juveniles, Race, Class, Ethnicity, School to Prison Pipeline, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Children in Isolation: The Solitary Confinement of Youth

Ismael Nazario was raised in Brooklyn, N.Y., by his mom, a single parent who always emphasized the importance of education and doing well in school. When Ismael was 13, his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. As she underwent chemotherapy … Continue reading

Posted in Conditions of Confinement, Juveniles, Legal Scholarship, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Engagement of Victims in Juvenile and Family Courts

By Shawn C. Marsh, Ph.D. and Kelly Ranasinghe, J.D., C.W.L.S. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, more than three million children were reported to authorities for abuse or neglect in 2012, with approximately two million of … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Blogger, Juvenile Court, Rehabilitation, Social science | Leave a comment

The Value of Law Students to Juvenile Court Practice

As I approach the end of my 11th year of teaching in a clinical program at the University of North Carolina School of Law, I have been thinking a lot about the value that students add to the dynamics of … Continue reading

Posted in Advocacy, Clinical Legal Education, Criminal /Juvenile Defense, Juvenile Court, Law Schools, Law Students | 1 Comment

Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope

By Patricia Robinson, University of North Carolina School of Law ’16 Destructive Justice: A Lost Boy, A Broken System, and the Small Light of Hope (2014) by Nicholas Frank is a book in which you know the story before you even begin. A … Continue reading

Posted in Adult Court, Books, Guest Blogger, Sentencing | Comments Off

Five Questions for Prof. Tamar Birckhead

Recently I was interviewed for the new Clinical Law Prof Blog .  The text of the interview appears below:       Last month the University of North Carolina School of Law appointed Professor Tamar Birckhead as Director of Clinical Programs.   … Continue reading

Posted in Blogosphere, Clinical Legal Education, Law Schools, Law Students | 1 Comment

From Turkey Trot to Twitter: Policing Puberty, Purity, and Sex Positivity

Professor Mae Quinn of Washington University in Saint Louis School of Law, who is an expert on criminal and juvenile justice system issues, has a new article that has just been posted to SSRN .  I look forward to reading it. … Continue reading

Posted in Gender, Juveniles, Legal Scholarship | Comments Off

When Reform Fails on the State Level, Turn to Local Advocates

North Carolina is the only state in the U.S. that treats all 16 and 17-year-olds as adults when they are charged with criminal offenses and then denies them the ability to appeal for return to the juvenile system. Although New … Continue reading

Posted in Juvenile Court, Juveniles, North Carolina, Rehabilitation | 2 Comments