Author Archives: Tamar Birckhead

About Tamar Birckhead

Law

Robbed of Childhood and Chances: Ferguson and Beyond

By Mae Quinn, Professor of Law, Washington University in St. Louis When I was a teen I fought viciously with my sister, hung out in places I should not have been, and walked the streets with my friends. A white … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Blogger, Juveniles, Race, Class, Ethnicity, Reports, School to Prison Pipeline | 1 Comment

Youth and Interrogation

By Kevin Lapp, Associate Professor of Law, Loyola Law School, Los Angeles Advocates, courts, and policymakers across the nation are considering how far the Supreme Court’s “children are different in a way that matters” criminal justice jurisprudence should extend. One of … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Blogger, Interrogation, Juveniles, Law Schools, U.S. Supreme Court, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Florida Supreme Court Throws Out Life Sentences for Juveniles

The Florida State Supreme Court unanimously ruled on March 19, 2015, that all of Florida’s juveniles convicted of homicide who received automatic sentences of life in prison must be resentenced under a state law passed in 2014. The long-awaited ruling answers the … Continue reading

Posted in Graham v. Florida, Miller v. Alabama, Sentencing, U.S. Supreme Court, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

No Perfect Victim

By Sarah Smith, JD, and Carlene Gonzalez, Ph.D., in conjunction with the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges Most people would agree that the victim of a crime is the last person who deserves to be judged. Yet … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Blogger, Social science | 2 Comments

Perceiving Adolescence

By Kevin Lapp, Associate Professor, Loyola Law School|Los Angeles The challenge of demarcating adolescence from childhood and adulthood comes mainly from figuring out when it ends. 18 has been the traditional end point, but many experts increasingly view adolescence as … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Blogger, Race, Class, Ethnicity, Social science, U.S. Supreme Court | Leave a comment

25 Year-Old Adolescents?

By Kevin Lapp, Associate Professor of Law, Loyola Law School|Los Angeles Adolescents are neither children nor adults. But who falls within the category of adolescents? Given the great advantages of age-based distinctions in clarity and efficiency, when does adolescence start … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Blogger, Juveniles, Social science | Comments Off

Just World Belief and Victim Blaming

By Alicia DeVault, B.S., and Martha-Elin Blomquist, Ph.D. Media coverage of recent events such as campus sexual assaults and officer-involved shootings brings to light a topic that is not often discussed: victim blaming. Victim blaming can be defined as holding … Continue reading

Posted in Guest Blogger, Psychology, Social science, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

Keeping a Grim Tally in Juvenile Court

One recent morning I sat in juvenile delinquency court on the fifth floor of the county courthouse in Durham, N.C., and kept a bleak tally. A 14-year-old boy admitted to a larceny charge for having stolen a video console and … Continue reading

Posted in Juvenile Court, Juveniles, North Carolina, Race, Class, Ethnicity, School to Prison Pipeline, Uncategorized | Comments Off

Juvenile Lifers: Reason for Hope

On December 1, 2014, the Supreme Court again deflected an effort to clarify whether its landmark 2012 decision in Miller v. Alabama banning mandatory life without parole sentences for juveniles should be applied retroactively. It was the second time this … Continue reading

Posted in Adult Court, Case Law, Miller v. Alabama, Sentencing, State Laws, U.S. Supreme Court | 1 Comment

Kiddie Court is No Joke for Juveniles

A client of mine, who I’ll call Deanna, was a 15-year-old in the ninth grade at a public high school in North Carolina. She lived with her mother, who was unemployed, and two younger brothers in government-subsidized housing. She had … Continue reading

Posted in Juvenile Court, Juveniles, Race, Class, Ethnicity, School to Prison Pipeline, Uncategorized | 1 Comment